VCL

Varnish Configuration Language

Author:Dag-Erling Smørgrav
Author:Poul-Henning Kamp
Author:Kristian Lyngstøl
Author:Per Buer
Date:2010-06-02
Version:1.0
Manual section:7

DESCRIPTION

The VCL language is a small domain-specific language designed to be used to define request handling and document caching policies for Varnish Cache.

When a new configuration is loaded, the varnishd management process translates the VCL code to C and compiles it to a shared object which is then dynamically linked into the server process.

SYNTAX

The VCL syntax is very simple, and deliberately similar to C and Perl. Blocks are delimited by curly braces, statements end with semicolons, and comments may be written as in C, C++ or Perl according to your own preferences.

In addition to the C-like assignment (=), comparison (==, !=) and boolean (!, && and ||) operators, VCL supports both regular expression and ACL matching using the ~ and the !~ operators.

Basic strings are enclosed in " ... ", and may not contain newlines.

Long strings are enclosed in {" ... "}. They may contain any character including ", newline and other control characters except for the NUL (0x00) character.

Unlike C and Perl, the backslash () character has no special meaning in strings in VCL, so it can be freely used in regular expressions without doubling.

Strings are concatenated using the '+' operator.

Assignments are introduced with the set keyword. There are no user-defined variables; values can only be assigned to variables attached to backend, request or document objects. Most of these are typed, and the values assigned to them must have a compatible unit suffix.

You can use the set keyword to arbitrary HTTP headers. You can remove headers with the remove or unset keywords, which are synonym.

You can use the rollback keyword to revert any changes to req at any time.

The synthetic keyword is used to produce a synthetic response body in vcl_error. It takes a single string as argument.

You can force a crash of the client process with the panic keyword. panic takes a string as argument.

The return(action) keyword terminates the subroutine. action can be, depending on context one of

  • deliver
  • error
  • fetch
  • hash
  • hit_for_pass
  • lookup
  • ok
  • pass
  • pipe
  • restart

Please see the list of subroutines to see what return actions are available where.

VCL has if tests, but no loops.

The contents of another VCL file may be inserted at any point in the code by using the include keyword followed by the name of the other file as a quoted string.

Backend declarations

A backend declaration creates and initializes a named backend object:

backend www {
  .host = "www.example.com";
  .port = "http";
}

The backend object can later be used to select a backend at request time:

if (req.http.host ~ "(?i)^(www.)?example.com$") {
  set req.backend = www;
}

To avoid overloading backend servers, .max_connections can be set to limit the maximum number of concurrent backend connections.

The timeout parameters can be overridden in the backend declaration. The timeout parameters are .connect_timeout for the time to wait for a backend connection, .first_byte_timeout for the time to wait for the first byte from the backend and .between_bytes_timeout for time to wait between each received byte.

These can be set in the declaration like this:

backend www {
  .host = "www.example.com";
  .port = "http";
  .connect_timeout = 1s;
  .first_byte_timeout = 5s;
  .between_bytes_timeout = 2s;
}

To mark a backend as unhealthy after number of items have been added to its saintmode list .saintmode_threshold can be set to the maximum list size. Setting a value of 0 disables saint mode checking entirely for that backend. The value in the backend declaration overrides the parameter.

Directors

A director is a logical group of backend servers clustered together for redundancy. The basic role of the director is to let Varnish choose a backend server amongst several so if one is down another can be used.

There are several types of directors. The different director types use different algorithms to choose which backend to use.

Configuring a director may look like this:

director b2 random {
  .retries = 5;
  {
    // We can refer to named backends
    .backend = b1;
    .weight  = 7;
  }
  {
    // Or define them inline
    .backend  = {
      .host = "fs2";
    }
  .weight         = 3;
  }
}
The family of random directors

There are three directors that share the same logic, called the random director, client director and hash director. They each distribute traffic among the backends assigned to it using a random distribution seeded with either the client identity, a random number or the cache hash (typically url). Beyond the initial seed, they act the same.

Each backend requires a .weight option which sets the amount of traffic each backend will get compared to the others. Equal weight means equal traffic. A backend with lower weight than an other will get proportionally less traffic.

The director has an optional .retries option which defaults to the number of backends the director has. The director will attempt .retries times to find a healthy backend if the first attempt fails. Each attempt re-uses the previous seed in an iterative manner. For the random director this detail is of no importance as it will give different results each time. For the hash and client director, this means the same URL or the same client will fail to the same server consistently.

The random director

This uses a random number to seed the backend selection.

The client director

The client director picks a backend based on the clients identity. You can set the VCL variable client.identity to identify the client by picking up the value of a session cookie or similar.

The hash director

The hash director will pick a backend based on the URL hash value.

This is useful is you are using Varnish to load balance in front of other Varnish caches or other web accelerators as objects won't be duplicated across caches.

It will use the value of req.hash, just as the normal cache lookup methods.

The round-robin director

The round-robin director does not take any options.

It will use the first backend for the first request, the second backend for the second request and so on, and start from the top again when it gets to the end.

If a backend is unhealthy or Varnish fails to connect, it will be skipped. The round-robin director will try all the backends once before giving up.

The DNS director

The DNS director can use backends in two different ways. Either like the random or round-robin director or using .list:

director directorname dns {
        .list = {
                .host_header = "www.example.com";
                .port = "80";
                .connect_timeout = 0.4s;
                "192.168.15.0"/24;
                "192.168.16.128"/25;
        }
        .ttl = 5m;
        .suffix = "internal.example.net";
}

This will specify 384 backends, all using port 80 and a connection timeout of 0.4s. Options must come before the list of IPs in the .list statement. The .list-method does not support IPv6. It is not a white-list, it is an actual list of backends that will be created internally in Varnish - the larger subnet the more overhead.

The .ttl defines the cache duration of the DNS lookups.

The above example will append "internal.example.net" to the incoming Host header supplied by the client, before looking it up. All settings are optional.

Health checks are not thoroughly supported.

DNS round robin balancing is supported. If a hostname resolves to multiple backends, the director will divide the traffic between all of them in a round-robin manner.

The fallback director

The fallback director will pick the first backend that is healthy. It considers them in the order in which they are listed in its definition.

The fallback director does not take any options.

An example of a fallback director:

director b3 fallback {
  { .backend = www1; }
  { .backend = www2; } // will only be used if www1 is unhealthy.
  { .backend = www3; } // will only be used if both www1 and www2
                       // are unhealthy.
}

Backend probes

Backends can be probed to see whether they should be considered healthy or not. The return status can also be checked by using req.backend.healthy.

Probes take the following parameters:

.url
Specify a URL to request from the backend. Defaults to "/".
.request
Specify a full HTTP request using multiple strings. .request will have \r\n automatically inserted after every string. If specified, .request will take precedence over .url.
.window
How many of the latest polls we examine to determine backend health. Defaults to 8.
.threshold
How many of the polls in .window must have succeeded for us to consider the backend healthy. Defaults to 3.
.initial
How many of the probes are considered good when Varnish starts. Defaults to the same amount as the threshold.
.expected_response
The expected backend HTTP response code. Defaults to 200.
.interval
Defines how often the probe should check the backend. Default is every 5 seconds.
.timeout
How fast each probe times out. Default is 2 seconds.

A backend with a probe can be defined like this, together with the backend or director:

backend www {
  .host = "www.example.com";
  .port = "http";
  .probe = {
    .url = "/test.jpg";
    .timeout = 0.3 s;
    .window = 8;
    .threshold = 3;
    .initial = 3;
  }
}

Or it can be defined separately and then referenced:

probe healthcheck {
   .url = "/status.cgi";
   .interval = 60s;
   .timeout = 0.3 s;
   .window = 8;
   .threshold = 3;
   .initial = 3;
   .expected_response = 200;
}

backend www {
  .host = "www.example.com";
  .port = "http";
  .probe = healthcheck;
}

If you have many backends this can simplify the config a lot.

It is also possible to specify the raw HTTP request:

probe rawprobe {
    # NB: \r\n automatically inserted after each string!
    .request =
      "GET / HTTP/1.1"
      "Host: www.foo.bar"
      "Connection: close";
}

ACLs

An ACL declaration creates and initializes a named access control list which can later be used to match client addresses:

acl local {
  "localhost";         // myself
  "192.0.2.0"/24;      // and everyone on the local network
  ! "192.0.2.23";      // except for the dialin router
}

If an ACL entry specifies a host name which Varnish is unable to resolve, it will match any address it is compared to. Consequently, if it is preceded by a negation mark, it will reject any address it is compared to, which may not be what you intended. If the entry is enclosed in parentheses, however, it will simply be ignored.

To match an IP address against an ACL, simply use the match operator:

if (client.ip ~ local) {
  return (pipe);
}

Regular Expressions

Varnish uses PCRE - Perl-compatible regular expressions. For a complete description of PCRE please see the pcre(3) man page.

To send flags to the PCRE engine, such as to turn on case insensitivity add the flag within parens following a question mark, like this:

# If host is NOT example dot com..
if (req.http.host !~ "(?i)example.com$") {
        ...
}

Functions

The following built-in functions are available:

hash_data(str)
Adds a string to the hash input. In default.vcl hash_data() is called on the host and URL of the request.
regsub(str, regex, sub)
Returns a copy of str with the first occurrence of the regular expression regex replaced with sub. Within sub, \0 (which can also be spelled \&) is replaced with the entire matched string, and \n is replaced with the contents of subgroup n in the matched string.
regsuball(str, regex, sub)
As regsuball() but this replaces all occurrences.
ban(ban expression)
Bans all objects in cache that match the expression.
ban_url(regex)
Bans all objects in cache whose URLs match regex.
Subroutines

A subroutine is used to group code for legibility or reusability:

sub pipe_if_local {
  if (client.ip ~ local) {
    return (pipe);
  }
}

Subroutines in VCL do not take arguments, nor do they return values.

To call a subroutine, use the call keyword followed by the subroutine's name:

call pipe_if_local;

There are a number of special subroutines which hook into the Varnish workflow. These subroutines may inspect and manipulate HTTP headers and various other aspects of each request, and to a certain extent decide how the request should be handled. Each subroutine terminates by calling one of a small number of keywords which indicates the desired outcome.

vcl_init

Called when VCL is loaded, before any requests pass through it. Typically used to initialize VMODs.

return() values:

ok
Normal return, VCL continues loading.
vcl_recv

Called at the beginning of a request, after the complete request has been received and parsed. Its purpose is to decide whether or not to serve the request, how to do it, and, if applicable, which backend to use.

The vcl_recv subroutine may terminate with calling return() on one of the following keywords:

error code [reason]
Return the specified error code to the client and abandon the request.
pass
Switch to pass mode. Control will eventually pass to vcl_pass.
pipe
Switch to pipe mode. Control will eventually pass to vcl_pipe.
lookup
Look up the requested object in the cache. Control will eventually pass to vcl_hit or vcl_miss, depending on whether the object is in the cache. The bereq.request value will be set to GET regardless of the value of req.request.
vcl_pipe

Called upon entering pipe mode. In this mode, the request is passed on to the backend, and any further data from either client or backend is passed on unaltered until either end closes the connection.

The vcl_pipe subroutine may terminate with calling return() with one of the following keywords:

error code [reason]
Return the specified error code to the client and abandon the request.
pipe
Proceed with pipe mode.
vcl_pass

Called upon entering pass mode. In this mode, the request is passed on to the backend, and the backend's response is passed on to the client, but is not entered into the cache. Subsequent requests submitted over the same client connection are handled normally.

The vcl_pass subroutine may terminate with calling return() with one of the following keywords:

error code [reason]
Return the specified error code to the client and abandon the request.
pass
Proceed with pass mode.
restart
Restart the transaction. Increases the restart counter. If the number of restarts is higher than max_restarts varnish emits a guru meditation error.
vcl_hash

You may call hash_data() on the data you would like to add to the hash.

The vcl_hash subroutine may terminate with calling return() with one of the following keywords:

hash
Proceed.
vcl_hit

Called after a cache lookup if the requested document was found in the cache.

The vcl_hit subroutine may terminate with calling return() with one of the following keywords:

deliver
Deliver the cached object to the client. Control will eventually pass to vcl_deliver.
error code [reason]
Return the specified error code to the client and abandon the request.
pass
Switch to pass mode. Control will eventually pass to vcl_pass.
restart
Restart the transaction. Increases the restart counter. If the number of restarts is higher than max_restarts varnish emits a guru meditation error.
vcl_miss

Called after a cache lookup if the requested document was not found in the cache. Its purpose is to decide whether or not to attempt to retrieve the document from the backend, and which backend to use.

The vcl_miss subroutine may terminate with calling return() with one of the following keywords:

error code [reason]
Return the specified error code to the client and abandon the request.
pass
Switch to pass mode. Control will eventually pass to vcl_pass.
fetch
Retrieve the requested object from the backend. Control will eventually pass to vcl_fetch.
vcl_fetch

Called after a document has been successfully retrieved from the backend.

The vcl_fetch subroutine may terminate with calling return() with one of the following keywords:

deliver
Possibly insert the object into the cache, then deliver it to the client. Control will eventually pass to vcl_deliver.
error code [reason]
Return the specified error code to the client and abandon the request.
hit_for_pass
Pass in fetch. This will create a hit_for_pass object. Note that the TTL for the hit_for_pass object will be set to what the current value of beresp.ttl. Control will be handled to vcl_deliver on the current request, but subsequent requests will go directly to vcl_pass based on the hit_for_pass object.
restart
Restart the transaction. Increases the restart counter. If the number of restarts is higher than max_restarts varnish emits a guru meditation error.
vcl_deliver

Called before a cached object is delivered to the client.

The vcl_deliver subroutine may terminate with one of the following keywords:

deliver
Deliver the object to the client.
restart
Restart the transaction. Increases the restart counter. If the number of restarts is higher than max_restarts varnish emits a guru meditation error.
vcl_error

Called when we hit an error, either explicitly or implicitly due to backend or internal errors.

The vcl_error subroutine may terminate by calling return with one of the following keywords:

deliver
Deliver the error object to the client.
restart
Restart the transaction. Increases the restart counter. If the number of restarts is higher than max_restarts varnish emits a guru meditation error.
vcl_fini

Called when VCL is discarded only after all requests have exited the VCL. Typically used to clean up VMODs.

return() values:

ok
Normal return, VCL will be discarded.

If one of these subroutines is left undefined or terminates without reaching a handling decision, control will be handed over to the builtin default. See the EXAMPLES section for a listing of the default code.

Multiple subroutines

If multiple subroutines with the the name of one of the builtin ones are defined, they are concatenated in the order in which they appear in the source. The default versions distributed with Varnish will be implicitly concatenated as a last resort at the end.

Example:

# in file "main.vcl"
include "backends.vcl";
include "ban.vcl";

# in file "backends.vcl"
sub vcl_recv {
  if (req.http.host ~ "(?i)example.com") {
    set req.backend = foo;
  } elsif (req.http.host ~ "(?i)example.org") {
    set req.backend = bar;
  }
}

# in file "ban.vcl"
sub vcl_recv {
  if (client.ip ~ admin_network) {
    if (req.http.Cache-Control ~ "no-cache") {
      ban_url(req.url);
    }
  }
}
Variables

Although subroutines take no arguments, the necessary information is made available to the handler subroutines through global variables.

The following variables are always available:

now
The current time, in seconds since the epoch. When used in string context it returns a formatted string.

The following variables are available in backend declarations:

.host
Host name or IP address of a backend.
.port
Service name or port number of a backend.

The following variables are available while processing a request:

client.ip
The client's IP address.
client.identity
Identification of the client, used to load balance in the client director.
server.hostname
The host name of the server.
server.identity
The identity of the server, as set by the -i parameter. If the -i parameter is not passed to varnishd, server.identity will be set to the name of the instance, as specified by the -n parameter.
server.ip
The IP address of the socket on which the client connection was received.
server.port
The port number of the socket on which the client connection was received.
req.request
The request type (e.g. "GET", "HEAD").
req.url
The requested URL.
req.proto
The HTTP protocol version used by the client.
req.backend
The backend to use to service the request.
req.backend.healthy
Whether the backend is healthy or not. Requires an active probe to be set on the backend.
req.http.header
The corresponding HTTP header.
req.hash_always_miss
Force a cache miss for this request. If set to true Varnish will disregard any existing objects and always (re)fetch from the backend.
req.hash_ignore_busy
Ignore any busy object during cache lookup. You would want to do this if you have two server looking up content from each other to avoid potential deadlocks.
req.can_gzip
Does the client accept the gzip transfer encoding.
req.restarts
A count of how many times this request has been restarted.
req.esi
Boolean. Set to false to disable ESI processing regardless of any value in beresp.do_esi. Defaults to true. This variable is subject to change in future versions, you should avoid using it.
req.esi_level
A count of how many levels of ESI requests we're currently at.
req.grace
Set to a period to enable grace.
req.xid
Unique ID of this request.

The following variables are available while preparing a backend request (either for a cache miss or for pass or pipe mode):

bereq.request
The request type (e.g. "GET", "HEAD").
bereq.url
The requested URL.
bereq.proto
The HTTP protocol version used to talk to the server.
bereq.http.header
The corresponding HTTP header.
bereq.connect_timeout
The time in seconds to wait for a backend connection.
bereq.first_byte_timeout
The time in seconds to wait for the first byte from the backend. Not available in pipe mode.
bereq.between_bytes_timeout
The time in seconds to wait between each received byte from the backend. Not available in pipe mode.

The following variables are available after the requested object has been retrieved from the backend, before it is entered into the cache. In other words, they are available in vcl_fetch:

beresp.do_stream
Deliver the object to the client directly without fetching the whole object into varnish. If this request is pass'ed it will not be stored in memory. As of Varnish Cache 3.0 the object will marked as busy as it is delivered so only client can access the object.
beresp.do_esi
Boolean. ESI-process the object after fetching it. Defaults to false. Set it to true to parse the object for ESI directives. Will only be honored if req.esi is true.
beresp.do_gzip
Boolean. Gzip the object before storing it. Defaults to false.
beresp.do_gunzip
Boolean. Unzip the object before storing it in the cache. Defaults to false.
beresp.http.header
The corresponding HTTP header.
beresp.proto
The HTTP protocol version used the backend replied with.
beresp.status
The HTTP status code returned by the server.
beresp.response
The HTTP status message returned by the server.
beresp.ttl
The object's remaining time to live, in seconds. beresp.ttl is writable.
beresp.grace
Set to a period to enable grace.
beresp.saintmode
Set to a period to enable saint mode.
beresp.backend.name
Name of the backend this response was fetched from.
beresp.backend.ip
IP of the backend this response was fetched from.
beresp.backend.port
Port of the backend this response was fetched from.
beresp.storage
Set to force Varnish to save this object to a particular storage backend.

After the object is entered into the cache, the following (mostly read-only) variables are available when the object has been located in cache, typically in vcl_hit, or when constructing a synthetic reply in vcl_error:

obj.proto
The HTTP protocol version used when the object was retrieved.
obj.status
The HTTP status code returned by the server.
obj.response
The HTTP status message returned by the server.
obj.ttl
The object's remaining time to live, in seconds. obj.ttl is writable.
obj.lastuse
The approximate time elapsed since the object was last requests, in seconds. This variable is also available in vcl_deliver.
obj.hits
The approximate number of times the object has been delivered. A value of 0 indicates a cache miss. This variable is also available in vcl_deliver.
obj.grace
The object's grace period in seconds. obj.grace is writable.
obj.http.header
The corresponding HTTP header.

The following variables are available while determining the hash key of an object:

req.hash
The hash key used to refer to an object in the cache. Used when both reading from and writing to the cache.

The following variables are available while preparing a response to the client:

resp.proto
The HTTP protocol version to use for the response.
resp.status
The HTTP status code that will be returned.
resp.response
The HTTP status message that will be returned.
resp.http.header
The corresponding HTTP header.

Values may be assigned to variables using the set keyword:

sub vcl_recv {
  # Normalize the Host: header
  if (req.http.host ~ "(?i)^(www.)?example.com$") {
    set req.http.host = "www.example.com";
  }
}

HTTP headers can be removed entirely using the remove keyword:

sub vcl_fetch {
  # Don't cache cookies
  remove beresp.http.Set-Cookie;
}

Grace and saint mode

If the backend takes a long time to generate an object there is a risk of a thread pile up. In order to prevent this you can enable grace. This allows varnish to serve an expired version of the object while a fresh object is being generated by the backend.

The following vcl code will make Varnish serve expired objects. All object will be kept up to two minutes past their expiration time or a fresh object is generated.

sub vcl_recv {
  set req.grace = 2m;
}
sub vcl_fetch {
  set beresp.grace = 2m;
}

Saint mode is similar to grace mode and relies on the same infrastructure but functions differently. You can add VCL code to vcl_fetch to see whether or not you like the response coming from the backend. If you find that the response is not appropriate you can set beresp.saintmode to a time limit and call restart. Varnish will then retry other backends to try to fetch the object again.

If there are no more backends or if you hit max_restarts and we have an object that is younger than what you set beresp.saintmode to be Varnish will serve the object, even if it is stale.

EXAMPLES

The following code is the equivalent of the default configuration with the backend address set to "backend.example.com" and no backend port specified:

backend default {
 .host = "backend.example.com";
 .port = "http";
}
/*-
 * Copyright (c) 2006 Verdens Gang AS
 * Copyright (c) 2006-2011 Varnish Software AS
 * All rights reserved.
 *
 * Author: Poul-Henning Kamp <phk@phk.freebsd.dk>
 *
 * Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
 * modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
 * are met:
 * 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
 *    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
 * 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
 *    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
 *    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
 *
 * THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE AUTHOR AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND
 * ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
 * IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
 * PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL AUTHOR OR CONTRIBUTORS BE
 * LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR
 * CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF
 * SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR 
 * BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY,
 * WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE
 * OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE,
 * EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
 *
 * The default VCL code.
 *
 * NB! You do NOT need to copy & paste all of these functions into your
 * own vcl code, if you do not provide a definition of one of these
 * functions, the compiler will automatically fall back to the default
 * code from this file.
 *
 * This code will be prefixed with a backend declaration built from the
 * -b argument.
 */

sub vcl_recv {
    if (req.restarts == 0) {
        if (req.http.x-forwarded-for) {
            set req.http.X-Forwarded-For =
                req.http.X-Forwarded-For + ", " + client.ip;
        } else {
            set req.http.X-Forwarded-For = client.ip;
        }
    }
    if (req.request != "GET" &&
      req.request != "HEAD" &&
      req.request != "PUT" &&
      req.request != "POST" &&
      req.request != "TRACE" &&
      req.request != "OPTIONS" &&
      req.request != "DELETE") {
        /* Non-RFC2616 or CONNECT which is weird. */
        return (pipe);
    }
    if (req.request != "GET" && req.request != "HEAD") {
        /* We only deal with GET and HEAD by default */
        return (pass);
    }
    if (req.http.Authorization || req.http.Cookie) {
        /* Not cacheable by default */
        return (pass);
    }
    return (lookup);
}

sub vcl_pipe {
    # Note that only the first request to the backend will have
    # X-Forwarded-For set.  If you use X-Forwarded-For and want to
    # have it set for all requests, make sure to have:
    # set bereq.http.connection = "close";
    # here.  It is not set by default as it might break some broken web
    # applications, like IIS with NTLM authentication.
    return (pipe);
}

sub vcl_pass {
    return (pass);
}

sub vcl_hash {
    hash_data(req.url);
    if (req.http.host) {
        hash_data(req.http.host);
    } else {
        hash_data(server.ip);
    }
    return (hash);
}

sub vcl_hit {
    return (deliver);
}

sub vcl_miss {
    return (fetch);
}

sub vcl_fetch {
    if (beresp.ttl <= 0s ||
        beresp.http.Set-Cookie ||
        beresp.http.Vary == "*") {
                /*
                 * Mark as "Hit-For-Pass" for the next 2 minutes
                 */
                set beresp.ttl = 120 s;
                return (hit_for_pass);
    }
    return (deliver);
}

sub vcl_deliver {
    return (deliver);
}

sub vcl_error {
    set obj.http.Content-Type = "text/html; charset=utf-8";
    set obj.http.Retry-After = "5";
    synthetic {"
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
 "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html>
  <head>
    <title>"} + obj.status + " " + obj.response + {"</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>Error "} + obj.status + " " + obj.response + {"</h1>
    <p>"} + obj.response + {"</p>
    <h3>Guru Meditation:</h3>
    <p>XID: "} + req.xid + {"</p>
    <hr>
    <p>Varnish cache server</p>
  </body>
</html>
"};
    return (deliver);
}

sub vcl_init {
        return (ok);
}

sub vcl_fini {
        return (ok);
}

The following example shows how to support multiple sites running on separate backends in the same Varnish instance, by selecting backends based on the request URL:

backend www {
  .host = "www.example.com";
  .port = "80";
}

backend images {
  .host = "images.example.com";
  .port = "80";
}

sub vcl_recv {
  if (req.http.host ~ "(?i)^(www.)?example.com$") {
    set req.http.host = "www.example.com";
    set req.backend = www;
  } elsif (req.http.host ~ "(?i)^images.example.com$") {
    set req.backend = images;
  } else {
    error 404 "Unknown virtual host";
  }
}

The following snippet demonstrates how to force a minimum TTL for all documents. Note that this is not the same as setting the default_ttl run-time parameter, as that only affects document for which the backend did not specify a TTL:

import std; # needed for std.log

sub vcl_fetch {
  if (beresp.ttl < 120s) {
    std.log("Adjusting TTL");
    set beresp.ttl = 120s;
  }
}

The following snippet demonstrates how to force Varnish to cache documents even when cookies are present:

sub vcl_recv {
  if (req.request == "GET" && req.http.cookie) {
     return(lookup);
  }
}

sub vcl_fetch {
  if (beresp.http.Set-Cookie) {
     return(deliver);
 }
}

The following code implements the HTTP PURGE method as used by Squid for object invalidation:

acl purge {
  "localhost";
  "192.0.2.1"/24;
}

sub vcl_recv {
  if (req.request == "PURGE") {
    if (!client.ip ~ purge) {
      error 405 "Not allowed.";
    }
    return(lookup);
  }
}

sub vcl_hit {
  if (req.request == "PURGE") {
    purge;
    error 200 "Purged.";
  }
}

sub vcl_miss {
  if (req.request == "PURGE") {
    purge;
    error 200 "Purged.";
  }
}

SEE ALSO

  • varnishd(1)
  • vmod_std(7)

HISTORY

VCL was developed by Poul-Henning Kamp in cooperation with Verdens Gang AS, Redpill Linpro and Varnish Software. This manual page was written by Dag-Erling Smørgrav and later edited by Poul-Henning Kamp and Per Buer.